York Minster: A Study in Suggestion

The other day I found myself in York with my camera, so I decided to go and visit the minster. It was the middle of the day, and the sun was shining brightly. I wanted to try something a little bit different to my usual architecture shots. I wanted to try making the Minster a near-silhouette against the bright blue sky, and the results are fitting of an old Gothic cathedral.

York Minster, 01 (Flickr).jpg
York Minster, #01

In this image the Minster towers above like a Gothic giant. I changed the blue-tone levels in Lightroom to simulate a red-filter, giving the dramatic effect seen in the sky, which serves to accentuate the dark form of the cathedral. The form of the Minster itself is intimidating but vague, having been nearly reduced to a silhouette, and this really draws me into the image.

York Minster, 02 (Flickr).jpg
York Minster, #02

This image is not quite as intimidating as the last. It features a close study of part of the Minster, with two adornments jutting out into the soft white cloud. The clouds themselves aren’t as harsh and contrasting as in the first image, and this gives the image a softer tone. Again, the Minster is mostly obscured, with only a few details visible, forcing you to really study the image.

These are two images of York Minster that I really like. They are not just studies in the form of this beautiful cathedral, but also studies in the use of light and form to suggest, rather than to tell. I like that. I’m not telling you anything with these images. I make suggestions, and it’s up to you to fill in the blanks.

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